Lately I have been interested in World War II. I have been watching great shows on the Military Channel and Discovery. I am fascinated with it. I was looking through my Amazon.com wish list and found that there are a lot of books I want to read. Here is my current list of World War II books I want to read. Father’s Day is approaching so why not make them a gift list after all guys like to read about War.

Guadalcanal Diary


Guadalcanal Diary was written by Richard Tregaskis. Richard Tregaskis was the first hardcore war correspondent serving in some of the fiercest fighting. His first embed was the U.S. Marine Corps invasion of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. This book is his firsthand account of frontline fighting in the first month of the battle. Eventually the fighting became too much for Tregaskis and he returned to the United States.  He wrote this book soon after his return. It is considered by many to be the ultimate guide to how to write a book on war.

Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest

This book was made famous through the HBO Miniseries “Band of Brothers“ which is based upon Stephen Ambrose’s book. In Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest, Stephen Ambrose narrates in vivid detail the adventures, misadventures, triumps and tragedies of a single U.S. Army infantry, E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne, from formation in July 1944 until November 1945. “Easy” Company endured some of the worst fighting in the European theater from D-Day in France, to Operation Market Garden in Holland, to Bastone during the Battle of the Bulge.

Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters


Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
The previous book detailed a large portion Major Dick Winters experiences in World War II. Winters decided to write his own memoirs to give more details to things missed in Ambrose’s book. On D-Day Major Winters became the commanding officer of his company when their company commander is killed in action. Winters is thought to be one of the greatest infantry leaders of the war. Winters has been praised as an exemplar of leadership, and here he shows what he did to earn that praise and how he did it. Very well done, book as well as war service.

D Day: June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II


Published to mark the 50th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, Stephen E. Ambrose’s D-Day: June 6, 1944
relies on over 1,400 interviews with veterans, as well as prodigious research in military archives on both sides of the Atlantic. He provides a comprehensive history of the invasion which also eloquently testifies as to how common soldiers performed extraordinary feats.

Six Armies in Normandy: From D-Day to the Liberation of Paris; June 6 – Aug. 5, 1944

I have seen Six Armies in Normandy: From D-Day to the Liberation of Paris; June 6 – Aug. 5, 1944; Revised
mentioned in a lot of different places. I don’t know much about it but it seems to be a popular read.


Amazon’s Review: John Keegan’s innovative approach to the invasion of Normandy correctly observes that the invasion, while colossal, was merely the beginning of a series of furious battles in northern France, and Keegan accordingly tackles not only the actions of June 6, 1944, but the subsequent Normandy campaigns by five Allied nations and their German opponents. Focusing on specific actions, such as the U.S. 101st Airborne night drop into France and the British infantry battles surrounding the city of Caen, he provides an exciting chronological account of the action in Normandy with considerable depth about tactical decisions.
Keegan is a skilled writer and his battle accounts are stirring. But beyond the vivid battle stories, this is also a book that will engage intellectually those who study battles and tactics, as well as the diplomatic activity that was necessary for the Allied victory in the Second World War’s European theater of operations. –Robert McNamara